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Join  in discussion of the latest public and members’ only movies.

Special One Off Screening for Members

We are very excited to announce that we are trialing a new system for Members OnlyScreenings that will give members extra value for their membership.

This will be a ONE off event at a new location and will replace our MOS movie for October Don’t Come Knocking. We will be screening a recent release that almost made our mid year program and we will be trialing a new location:

Frantz
Thursday, 5 Oct 2017
The Playhouse, Maleny Showgrounds, Maleny QLD 4552
7:00pm Doors Open, 7:15pm Movie Starts
Free Entry
Members ONLY

There will be a discussion following Frantz, for those who wish to stay on.
Members are invited to bring a contribution for the supper table.

Please see the trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dv6NJunxRQQ

 

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    Travelling Film Festival in Nambour

    The Travelling Film Festival has been bringing the best on screen to regional Australia since David Stratton founded it in 1974, and we are thrilled to be bringing the festival to Nambour for the first time this year!

    Showcasing a curated program of award-winning titles from around the world, fresh from their screenings at the Sydney Film Festival in June, we hope to make the festival an important part of Nambour’s cultural calendar for years to come.

    The Festival is held between Friday 6 – Sunday 8 October. For More Info go to  http://sff.org.au/2017-film-guide/travelling-film-festival-nambour/

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      ROSE BLUM

      ROSALIE BLUM for French Film Lovers screening at Caloundra

      The first of Caloundra Film Festival series of special screenings during 2017 has been announced.
      The biggest hit in the 27-year history of the Alliance Française French Film Festival, Julien Rappeneau’s enchanting directorial debut ROSALIE BLUM is a witty and ingeniously crafted comedy about a random encounter that has unexpected and life-changing consequences.
      Check screening time, bookings and all other information here. www.caloundrafilmfestival.com

       

      ROSE BLUM

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        mfs-remember-when-invitation

        25 Year Anniversary of Maleny Film Society

        Don’t miss our special event on the 13th of NovemberRemember When – 25 Years of the Maleny Film Society. It is a time to reflect, remember and celebrate all the wonderful times we have had at our screenings and festivals over the years. A dedicated team of volunteers have been working away at this event to ensure it will be memorable.

        And the best news is… it is FREE entry… However you must RSVP for catering purposes tomalenyfilmsociety@gmail.com with your name and number of people attending.

        Details are on the invite below.

        We hope you can make it….

        The Maleny Film Society!

        mfs-remember-when-invitation

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          Rockin’ Metropolis

          Metropolis Poster A3(RADF).indd

          Fritz Lang’s Metropolis was one of the seminal movies from the silent era. It’s amazing how powerful some of its images still are. The use of shadows, huge futuristic sets, restless diagonals and crowd scenes still impress. Nowadays we are used to sound that is no less powerful than the visuals on screen. Meanwhile music needs to be about something and as a change from rock’s usual staple of ‘lurve’, why not a story about workers rebelling in an alienating future technocracy? Enter Honey Bird who have written a rock music accompaniment to Metropolis. Their live performance, incorporating the Sedici Corde String Quartet, provided a much-appreciated night’s entertainment last Friday.

          The film was made in 1927. By an interesting coincidence, so were two films that have been chosen for the Members Only screenings for next year. These are the famous Australian silent For the Term of His Natural Life and The Jazz Singer, renowned as the first film with audio dialogue.

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            Walking in the Woods

            Walk_Woods_PosterThis must be the fourth or fifth film in which one or two people set off on an ill-advised or seemingly impossible hike. Are we seeing the emergence of a new sub-genre?  If you are game to risk losing yourself in the woods you will Find Yourself. Certainly this outing for old troopers Redford and Nolte has been one of the most keenly awaited movies of 2015 by many of our regulars.  Not having been able to get to see it myself, I am curious as to whether those who did were satisfied or otherwise. Post your comments  below.

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              Court

              Court-posterCourt may not provide the conventional satisfactions of a courtroom drama. We don’t get the surprise last-minute witness or flight of brilliant rhetoric from a defence attorney that turns things around. It is humdrum and banal—but that’s the point.  Yet it offers many more insights into modern India than, say, Slumdog Millionaire. Like the recent Russian film Leviathan the film depicts injustice but it is a casual offhand, rather than malevolent, sort of injustice. The police are too ready to see the old leftie folk singer as a potentially dangerous rabble-rouser but a more confident prosecutor would refuse to run with the case. The scenes of the prosecutor’s family life establish her limitations. The judge is not corrupt, but he’s not going to rock the boat either. Both are just little cogs in the machinery even if they are climbing up the socio-economic scale. The very long shots in which the camera gazes at some place well before and/or after any significant action occurs contribute to the feeling of a juggernaut that rolls along at its own frustratingly glacial pace. I would be interested in what people made of the curious final sequence at the holiday resort.

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                X + Y

                The director of X + Y previously made a documentary about the British team that contested the 2006 Internationalx+Y_poster Mathematical Olympiad. The silver medallist was Daniel Lightfoot, who has Asperger’s and who provided a model for the character Nathan in X + Y. y Daniel describes his ordeals with school teachers who didn’t accept that he knew better or thought he was cheating here: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/daniel-lightwing-/xy-film-daniel-lightwing_b_6845324.html

                Nathan is the third English genius-with-issues on our screen this year, preceded by Stephen Hawking in Theory of Everything and Alan Turing in The Imitation Game. It is difficult for cinema to convey the rarefied intellectual world of such people; maths for them has a meaningfulness and beauty most of us cannot share. But perhaps cinema turns too quickly and gratefully to the realm of the emotions with the usual familiar roller coaster of crises and improbably dramatic resolutions.

                Still, the film provides insights into the ordeal of young people with Asperger’s and their families. The visit to Taipei was interesting. Nathan’s oddness was less conspicuous in a different cultural setting and for the Chinese being ‘gifted’ is not something to apologise for.

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                  Far From Men

                  FarFromMen_poster

                  Almost everything is harsh here: the rugged desert landscape, the bitter war breaking out as Algerians fight France (and French settlers) for independence, the payback rules governing village feuds. In such an environment you have to wonder whether half a tube of condensed milk and the promise that nomads will welcome a stranger can be relied on. Viggo Mortensen is excellent in conveying the toughness needed, while retaining decency and sensitivity. The film expands the Albert Camus short story on which it is based (‘The Guest’ published in the volume Exile and the Kingdom). In the short story Daru releases the prisoner after the first night, giving him the two options about directions to take, but faces a more serious threat of retribution. The movie somewhat changes the stark terms of Camus’ existentialist philosophy but is still a convincing account of a man who doesn’t want to have to take sides.

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                    Last Cab to Darwin

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                    It was a full house for this movie and understandably so. Michael Caton, one of Australia’s best-loved actors, invests his Broken Hill taxi driver with laid-back charm and quiet dignity. Jacki Weaver’s crusading doctor becomes a more morally ambiguous character as things proceed. Mark Coles Smith brings energy and charisma to the role of the feckless Tilly. The film comfortably deploys familiar road movie conventions and why not, this is a feel-good film after all. Even the dog gets a reprieve. Feral cats won’t like it but they probably won’t see it. The script manages to avoid offending either side of the debate about euthanasia. I don’t much like the idea of tapping the space bar on a computer keyboard to end it all. Not unless you have a cold beer in your other hand and a nice view of the sun going down.

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                      Elementary

                      Mr.-Holmes-movie-poster

                      Two old men facing the end. Both loners, rather emotionally stunted, with loose ends to tie up before they shuffle. One does it the easy way by driving to Darwin through the good old Australian outback where, as always, opportunities for redemption await at every second roadhouse. See above. Mr Holmes, English and intellectual, does it the hard way, groping through  mysteries and  flashbacks to different stages of his incompletely remembered past. A  clever idea to imagine Sherlock Holmes as a doddery bee-keeper still alive after World War II.  Ian McKellen admirably conveys the anguish of a man who realises he was too coldly logical. But wasn’t that what we loved about Sherlock? Who would have wanted some  empathetic social worker? Should fictional heroes have to grow old as we that are left grow old? What do you think?

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                        Clouds of Sils Maria

                        COSM_poster

                        Were you engrossed, baffled, intrigued, annoyed, impressed . . .? A New Yorker review * concedes the film is disorienting enough to ‘send many viewers reeling’ but points out that it’s about acting, where the boundaries between what is real and what is not are blurred. Moreover, it’s about a star who has to return from mountain hikes to the unreal world of the celebrity, a world now speeded up by mobile phones, Skype and googling. Quite a while since a movie had characters reaching so frequently and desperately for cigarettes; did Philip Morris help fund it? Were the famous clouds tobacco smoke? A great depiction of the generation gap when Juliette Binoche cannot believe her young PA (Kristen Stewart) takes the sci-fi film seriously. But equally hard to take seriously the clunky-sounding play Binoche agonises about. Your thoughts? *http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/04/20/way-up-high

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                        1. Jill Dent says:

                          The wordy, confusing and unfocused discussion in the evening was actually a bit of a downer after the high inspiration of the afternoon’s heartfelt stories about dementia and the diverse suggestions of stimuli to help both carers and ‘carees’. Many a tear was shed.
                          Three local productions, a gentle documentary by Griffith University students set in Japan (in a mountain village of charming eccentrics, reminiscent of the magic of Maleny), and the motivational US feature ‘Alive Inside’ have between them sparked off huge future efforts in Maleny – not in film-making, but in caring for dementia sufferers in our street-midst and our local care centres. I have heard only one negative comment: ‘I will never go near that sort of thing again’ – a strong denial; outweighed by many positive plans – among them a local volunteer carer who is determined to utilise recording machines and headphones already donated by Maleny Rotary, battle through access to music based on personal interviews (lots of work, lots of people, lots of volunteer time) – so the MFS has achieved that much with one special matinee. It was an expensive undertaking, but well worth the community capital spent in the future. The large crowd (including many who had travelled far) was evidence that people do care! Jill .

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